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ENGLISH LANGUAGE

CODE 61342
ACADEMIC YEAR 2022/2023
CREDITS
  • 9 cfu during the 2nd year of 9265 LINGUE E LETTERATURE MODERNE PER I SERVIZI CULTURALI(LM-38) - GENOVA
  • 9 cfu during the 2nd year of 9265 LINGUE E LETTERATURE MODERNE PER I SERVIZI CULTURALI(LM-37) - GENOVA
  • SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR L-LIN/12
    LANGUAGE English
    TEACHING LOCATION
  • GENOVA
  • SEMESTER Annual
    PREREQUISITES
    Prerequisites
    You can take the exam for this unit if you passed the following exam(s):
    • MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES FOR CULTURAL SERVICES 9265 (coorte 2021/2022)
    • ENGLISH LANGUAGE I LM 55920
    TEACHING MATERIALS AULAWEB

    OVERVIEW

    The course introduces the students to Cognitive Linguistics. This linguistic paradigm conceives of language as an integrated part of human cognition and analyses it in relation to other cognitive domains and faculties, such as bodily and mental experiences, categorisation, abstract thought, inferencing, etc. Overall, language is usage-based as it is the outcome of our interaction, both physical and mental, with the world.

    The course will address some of the main topics of Cognitive Linguistics applied to the English language, also contrastively to Italian, such as: usage-based model, meaning construction, conceptual metonymy and metaphor, argoment structure construction, motion events, force dynamics, and speech acts. Special attention will be devoted to the robust contribution of Cognitive Linguistics to English language acquisition and teaching.

     

    The course is flanked by a practical English language module ("esercitazioni") that brings students to the C2.1 level of CEFR. 

    AIMS AND CONTENT

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The English Language 2 course continues the theoretical introduction to English language and linguistics by placing the focus on cognitive and functional principles that motivate meaning construction. The course includes a practical English language module at the C2 Level of the “Common European Framework of Reference for Languages”

    AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The course aims to:

    • provide students with basic theoretical and methodological knowledge in the field of Cognitive Linguistics;

    • lead students to learn how to apply cognitivist principles to the study and analysis of the English language;

    • apply Cognitive Linguistics and Cognitive Construction Grammar to Second Language Learning and Teaching;

    • arise students’ awareness of the relationship between linguistic structure, conceptual structure, and the nature of the embodied human experience;

    • foster awareness of research methodology and prompt group discussion and presentation of some linguistic phenomena to be agreed upon with the lecturer.

     

    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    KNOWLEDGE and UNDERSTANDING:

    • master the basic theoretical principles of Cognitive Linguistics;

    • identify the close relationship between language and thought;

    • distinguish the relationship that Cognitive Linguistics holds with other theoretical frameworks of Linguistics (e.g., Structuralism and Generativism), as well as the major relevance of Interpretive Semiotics (Ch. S. Peirce) than Structural Semiotics (F. de Saussure).

     

    APPLYING KNOWLEDGE & MAKING JUDGEMENTS:

    • apply the models and principles of Cognitive Linguistics to the analysis of several phenomena of the English language;

    • conduct research of selected linguistic phenomena;

    • identify and apply the tenets of Cognitive Linguistics to language learning and teaching.

     

    COMMUNICATION SKILLS:

    • discuss in class personal opinions and ideas based on the assumptions of Cognitive Linguistics with clarity and effectiveness;

    • deliver presentations on a range of topics in Cognitive Linguistics to peers during classes.

     

    LEARNING SKILLS:

    • analyse English data mainly related to syntax, lexis, and pragmatics;

    • develop learning and reflection skills in the field of Cognitive Linguistics and its applications.

     

     

     

     

    PREREQUISITES

    Attainment of “Lingua Inglese I” (code 55920). 

    TEACHING METHODS

    English Language II (LM) is divided into two parts, a one-semester linguistics module ("theoretical module") and a two-semester practical module ( "esercitazioni"). 

    The linguistics module ("theoretical module") is an introduction to English Cognitive Linguistics. Students are required to actively lead and participate in class discussions, also delivering -during the lessons- a PowerPoint presentation of readings and research assignments on topics agreed upon with the lecturer

    The practical language module aims to bring students to the C2.1 level (upper end of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages). 

     

    Attendance is strongly recommended.

    SYLLABUS/CONTENT

    The linguistics module is made up of weekly lectures (3 hours a week over 10 weeks in the first semester).  Attendance is strongly recommended.

    The practical module is made up of weekly classes (4 hours a week over 20 weeks, i.e. 10 weeks per semester).

    The syllabus for attenders and non-attenders is the same.

    RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Baicchi, Annalisa. 2018. 'Ception' and the discrepancy between vision and language. In A. Baicchi, J.L. Sandford, & R. Digonnet (Eds.), Sensory Perceptions in Language, Embodiment and Epistemology. Berlin, Springer: pp. 95-109.

    Danesi, Marcel. 2021. Linguistic Relativity today. New York/London, Routledge: pp. 1-20.

    Dirven, René. 2005. Major strands in Cognitive Linguistics. In A. Baicchi, C. Broccias & A. Sansò (Eds.), Modeling Thought and Constructing Meaning. Cognitive Models in Interaction. Milano, FrancoAngeli: pp. 11-40.

    Goldberg, Adele Eve & Devin Casenhiser. 2006. English Constructions. In Bas Aarts & April McMahon. The Handbook of English Linguistics. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 343-355.

    Herbst, Thomas. 2016. Foreign language learning is construction learning. In S. de Knop & Gaetanelle Gilquin (Eds.).Applied Construction Grammar. Berlin/Boston, de Gruyter Mouotn: pp. 21-46.

    Krzeszowski, Tomasz. 1993. The axiological parameter in preconceptional image schemata. In R.Geyger & B. Rudzka-Ostyn (Eds.). Conceptualizations and Mental Processing in Language. Berlin, Mouton de Gruyter: pp. 307-329.

    Littlemore, Jeannette. 2009. Applying Cognitive Linguistics to Second Language Learning and Teaching. Basingston/New York, Palgrave-Macmillan: chapters 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9.

    Radden, Guenter et al. 2007. Aspects of Meaning Construction. Amsterdam/Philadelphia, John Benjamins: pp. 1-12.

    Radden, Guenter & René Dirven. 2007. English Cognitive Grammar. Amsterdam/Philadelphia, John Benjamins: chapter 1 (Categories in thought and language: pp. 1-17) and chapter 2 (Cognitive operations in thought and language: pp. 21-36).

     

     

    Further material will be uploaded on AulaWeb.

    TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

    LESSONS

    LESSONS START

    October 2022.

     

    Class schedule

    ENGLISH LANGUAGE

    EXAMS

    EXAM DESCRIPTION

    Each component ("linguistucs module" and " practical language module") is assessed separately.

    The linguistics module is assessed through a written exam paper, which includes open questions and exercises, at the end of the first semester. There are two sittings in each of the three exam sessions. Students can choose only one sitting per session and cannot repeat a failed exam in the same session.

    The practical module is assessed at the end of the second semester through a written exam paper . There are two sittings in each of the three exam sessions. Students can choose only one sitting per session and cannot repeat a failed test in the same session.

     

    ASSESSMENT METHODS

    The final mark is calculated as follows:

    50% (of the overall mark) is the linguistics module.

    50% (of the overall mark) is the practical module.

    FURTHER INFORMATION

    Special needs students should contact Prof. Sara Dickinson (sara.dickinson@unige.it).