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CODE 65329
ACADEMIC YEAR 2024/2025
CREDITS
SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR L-ANT/03
LANGUAGE Italian
TEACHING LOCATION
  • GENOVA
SEMESTER 1° Semester
TEACHING MATERIALS AULAWEB

OVERVIEW

Knowledge of Roman history is essential and implicitly obvious in a degree course in Arts both for those who wish to analyse classical disciplines and those who are interested in themes and periods that are less removed. This is a fundamental period for the development of the civilisation in which we live.

 

AIMS AND CONTENT

LEARNING OUTCOMES

The educational objectives, as part of the course of the Bachelor's degree (laurea triennale) in History, aim to provide students with the following knowledge, skills and abilities: possessing a basic knowledge of the historical development of the Roman world, of the main events and foundations of its civilization, inserted in the context of the ancient history of the Mediterranean world; achieving the methodological and technical skills necessary to address the documentary bases of Roman history, with particular reference to literary and epigraphic texts, without neglecting the archaeological evidence and the contribution of the documentary sciences; being able to orient oneself in bibliographical research and to know the ways of its updates through the use of research tools; recognizing the essential characteristics (political, economic, social, religious) of the Roman world and the main lines of evolution, in the diachronic and synchronic sense, of political institutions through the analysis of the surviving documentation.

AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

Intended learning outcomes of this course in the context of the three year degree (laurea triennale) in history are for students to acquire the following knowledge, competencies, abilities and skills:

    1. basic knowledge of the historical of the development of the Roman world, principal events and foundation of its civilization in the context of the ancient history of the Mediterranean, as well as the relationship to modern  geography;  
    2. methodological and technical competencies to confront  the basic documentation of Roman history, with particular attention to literary, epigraphical and archaeological sources;
    3. orientation in bibliographical research and how to supplement and support with additional sources;
    4. familiarity with the essential characteristics (political, economic, social, religious) of the Roman world and the principal lines of the evolution diachronically as well as synchronically of the political institutions utilizing surviving documentation;
    5. learning some of the peculiar features of the society of the Roman world and of particular aspects of its daily life, on the basis of its sources.

PREREQUISITES

Being fond of history. Teaching presupposes the ability to study manuals and texts independently. Knowledge of Latin is not essential to take the Roman History course. 

TEACHING METHODS

The course will take place with lectures, for a total of 80 hours (for the students attending the course for 12 cfu), 60 hours (9 cfu). For every class is foreseen the support of Power Point slides and richly detailed documentation made available with photocopies especially regarding literary sources (transalated into Italian). 

Lessons will be held in presence. Attendance, although not compulsory, is recommended. Only those who attend lessons in presence will be deemed attending students. 

Students are requested to register to the related course available in the ‘Aula web’.

 

SYLLABUS/CONTENT

Contents for students taking the course for 12 cfu 

Introductory framework: background sources. Historical framework: events, society and civilization from the origines to the Justinian era. Institutional and geographical framework: organisation of the Roman state and its functioning. Introduction to Roman antiquities: aspects of Roman daily life in Roma and in the Roman world.

Contents for students taking the course for 9 cfu

Introductory framework: background sources. Historical framework: events, society and civilization from the origines to the Justinian era. Institutional and geographical framework: organisation of the Roman state and its functioning. Introduction to Roman antiquities: some aspects of Roman daily life in Roma and in the Roman world.

 

RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

       It is advisable to supplement the study of the manual consulting an appropriate history atlas on the subject of the Roman world ( e.g: T. Cornell-J.Matthews, Atlante del mondo romano;  Richard J. A Talbert,  Roger S. Bagnall, Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, can be consulted in Unige library) .


Bibliography for students taking the course for 12 cfu

Contents for students attending the course:

  •  Classes notes (including introduction to Roman antiquities: Aspetti di vita quotidiana a Roma e nel mondo romano)
  • G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Manuale di storia romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2020.

Contents for non attending students the course:

  • G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Manuale di storia romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2020.
  • D. Faoro (a cura di), L'amministrazione dell'Italia romana dal I secolo a.C. al III secolo d.C. Fondamenti, Firenze, Edumond Le Monnier, 2018.
  • Appunti di storiografia romana, please send a mail to elena.cimarosti@unige.it to receive the copy text.

And a book chosen from:

        4. J. Carcopino, La vita quotidiana a Roma all'apogeo dell'Impero, Laterza, Paris 1939, trad. it. Bari 1941 (economica 1993 e successive ristampe).
        4. F. Cenerini, La donna romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2013.
        4. P. Arena, Gladiatori, carri e navi. Gli spettacoli nell’antica Roma, Carocci, Roma 2020.


 Bibliography for students taking the course for 9 cfu

Contents for students attending the course:

  • Classes notes (including some introductives modules to Roman antiquities: Aspetti di vita quotidiana a Roma e nel mondo romano)
  • G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Manuale di storia romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2020.

Contents for non attending students the course:

  • G. Cresci Marrone, F. Rohr Vio, L. Calvelli, Roma antica. Storia e documenti, Manuale di storia romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2020.
  • D. Faoro (a cura di), L'amministrazione dell'Italia romana dal I secolo a.C. al III secolo d.C. Fondamenti, Firenze, Edumond Le Monnier, 2018.
  • Appunti di storiografia romana, please send a mail to elena.cimarosti@unige.it to receive the copy text.

And a book chosen from:

       4. J. Carcopino, La vita quotidiana a Roma all'apogeo dell'Impero, Laterza, Paris 1939, trad. it. Bari 1941 (Economica Laterza 1993 and following editions): choosing between one of the two parts: Prefazione e Parte prima, L'ambiente della vita romana, pp. 3-158; Prefazione Parte secondaL'impiego del tempo, pp. 3-5, 167-301.
      4. ​P. Arena, Gladiatori, carri e navi. Gli spettacoli nell’antica Roma, Carocci, Roma 2020 [a scelta capitoli 1, 2 e 5 oppure 3, 4, 5].
      4. ​F. Cenerini, La donna romana, Il Mulino, Bologna 2013 [a scelta capitoli 1, 2, 3, 4 e 7 oppure 1, 2, 5, 6, e 7].

TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

LESSONS

LESSONS START

September 2024 

Class schedule

ROMAN HISTORY

EXAMS

EXAM DESCRIPTION

It is required to register online for exams via the University website, which must be done at least five days before the exam date.

During the course of the lessons, two mid-term/progress tests will be scheduled for attending students, in addition to the official exam. These tests will be averaged with the oral examination for awarding the final grade, only if passed:

  • The first written "mid-term/progress" test will consist of a number of closed and open-ended questions on programme content already covered in class (points 1 and 3). Each answer will be worth 1 or 2 points for the possibility of earning a total of 30 points.  Only those who pass the first mid-term/progress test will be eligible to take the second test.
  • The second written "mid-term/progress" test will be held during the last week of the course (approximately the second week of December) and will consist of a number of closed and open-ended questions on the subject of the Roman Monarchy and Republic (Chapters 1-11 of the Cresci-Rohr-Calvelli textbook which corresponds to the first part of point 2 of the syllabus, in addition to what was covered in class). Each answer will be worth 1 or 2 points for the possibility of earning a total of 30 points.  

Starting from the January 2025 session, those students who have passed both mid-term/progress tests will be eligible to sit for the exit interview. The discussion topics will only cover the rest of the syllabus, i.e., Imperial and Late Antiquity (Chapters 12-23 of the Cresci- Rohr-Calvelli textbook which corresponds to the second part of point 2, in addition to what has been discussed in class) and the modules relating to the Aspects of daily life in Rome and the Roman world, as proposed in class (point 4 of the syllabus). Further indications regarding the duration and conduct of the mid-term/progress tests and the examination will be provided in class.

For non-attending students and for those among the attending students who did not pass the mid-term/progress tests, the examination will consist of an oral interview, lasting approximately 30 minutes, according to the syllabus.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Minimun requirements to achieve a positive result will be a good knowledge of the history and its institutions of Roman civilization during its whole development, with clear critical skill and proper language.

Knowledge of the Latin language will be requested to reach excellence level.

The oral exam will let the exam board to evaluate the following competencies (valid and common not depending on the quantity of the credits for taking the course):

1. basic knowledge of the historical of the development of the Roman world, principal events and foundation of its civilization in the context of the ancient history of the Mediterranean, as well as the relationship to modern  geography; 

2. methodological and technical competencies to confront  the basic documentation of Roman history, with particular attention to literary, epigraphical and archaeological sources;

3. orientation in bibliographical research and how to supplement and support with additional sources;

4. familiarity with the essential characteristics (political, economic, social, religious) of the Roman world and the principal lines of the evolution diachronically as well as synchronically of the political institutions utilizing surviving documentation;

5. learning some of the peculiar features of the society of the Roman world and of particular aspects of its daily life, on the basis of its sources.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

For students with disabilities or specific learning disorders (DSA).

     Students with disabilities or specific learning disorders (DSA) may consult the guidelines for requesting services, compensatory and/or dispensatory measures and specific aids at the following link:https://unige.it/sites/unige.it/files/2024-05/Linee%20guida%20per%20la%20richiesta%20di%20servizi%2C%20di%20strumenti%20compensativi%20e_o%20di%20misure%20dispensative%20e%20di%20ausili%20specifici%20Maggio%202024.pdf