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ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ARTS

CODE 72637
ACADEMIC YEAR 2022/2023
CREDITS
  • 12 cfu during the 1st year of 8453 CONSERVAZIONE DEI BENI CULTURALI (L-1) - GENOVA
  • 12 cfu during the 2nd year of 8453 CONSERVAZIONE DEI BENI CULTURALI (L-1) - GENOVA
  • 9 cfu during the 3nd year of 8453 CONSERVAZIONE DEI BENI CULTURALI (L-1) - GENOVA
  • 6 cfu during the 1st year of 8457 LETTERE (L-10) - GENOVA
  • SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR L-ANT/07
    LANGUAGE Italian
    TEACHING LOCATION
  • GENOVA
  • SEMESTER 2° Semester
    TEACHING MATERIALS AULAWEB

    OVERVIEW

    The course of "Archeology and History of Greek and Roman Art" aims to analyze the main artistic phenomena and the most important aspects of material culture related to Greek and Roman civilization, from the beginning of the Archaic age to late antiquity, in the framework of their historical and economic-social context.

    AIMS AND CONTENT

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The “Archaeology and history of Greek and Roman art” course aims to give an overall framework of history of ancient art and the historical development of Greek and Roman material culture from the 11th century BC to the 5th century AD.

    AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Through the discussion of key topics and the analysis of selected contexts, the course aims to provide students with critical tools for knowledge and understanding of the main issues related to urban planning, architecture, artistic and craft production and material culture of the Greek and Roman world, examined in their historical development, from the origins to the beginning of late antiquity.

    At the end of the 6 cfu course, the student:

    - will be able to critically analyze fundamental issues of Greek and Roman urban planning, architecture, art, craft and material culture, and to understand contexts, works and monuments in their historical and social context;

    - will be able to  profitably use the ancient sources and the bibliographic tools;

    - will also have acquired a general knowledge of art and craft techniques in use in the Greek and Roman world and of the technical lexicon relating to classical archaeology studies;

    - will have the basic skills of archaeology and history of classical art useful for accessing the master's degree courses in the archaeological, philological, historical and historical-artistic fields.

    At the end of the 9-12 cfu course, the student will also have acquired an increasingly (from 9 to 12) greater ability to analyze, contextualize and understand key aspects and phenomena of Greek and Roman archeology and art.

    PREREQUISITES

    A good historical and geographical knowledge of the different areas of the Mediterranean from the 10th century B.C. to the 5th century A.D. is useful. Students having some knowledge about Greek and Roman civilizations are also at an advantage.

    TEACHING METHODS

    Frontal lectures, with use of PowerPoint and other audiovisual media; reading assignments followed by discussion in class (teaching materials will be included in AulaWeb); case study analysis; possible visits to archaeological sites and museums; group work.

    It is strongly recommended to register for the course on AulaWeb, to receive information and download the teaching material analyzed in class.

    The course activity can be integrated with participation in laboratory activities, lectures, archaeological excavations and surveys organized by the teacher.

    Lectures will take place with students in presence. Class participation is highly recommended. Students who cannot attend the course must request to the Professor in order to watch the lectures remotely (via teams) and have access to the recordings.

    SYLLABUS/CONTENT

    Contents for students who are attending the 6-CFU course:

    Greek and Roman archeology and art from the Protogeometric to the late Imperial age: forms, paths, contexts. Topics covered: the origin and evolution of the temple in the Archaic age; the evolution of the statuary type of the kouros; female statuary and korai; vase painting in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, the black-figure technique; 5th century sculpture up to Polykleitos and Phidias; the sanctuary of Olympia: architecture and sculpture; vase painting from red figures to the echoes of megalographies; the acropolis of Athens: architecture and sculpture; post-Parthenon architecture and sculpture; Praxiteles, Skopas and Lysippos; architecture from the 4th century B.C. to late Hellenism; paintings from the tombs of Verghina to the invention of the landscape; Hellenistic sculpture; Greek art for Rome; Rome: the Kingdom and early and middle Republican age; art and politics in the late Republican age; the Augustan age; the Julio-Claudian and Flavian ages; the century of the "good emperors" (from Nerva to the Antonini); the third century A.D.; late antique art.

    Contents for students who are attending the 9-CFU course:

    Greek and Roman archeology and art from the Protogeometric to the late Imperial age: forms, paths, contexts. Topics covered: the origin and evolution of the temple in the Archaic age; the evolution of the statuary type of the kouros; female statuary and korai; vase painting in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, the black-figure technique; 5th century sculpture up to Polykleitos and Phidias; the sanctuary of Olympia: architecture and sculpture; vase painting from red figures to the echoes of megalographies; the acropolis of Athens: architecture and sculpture; post-Parthenon architecture and sculpture; Praxiteles, Skopas and Lysippos; architecture from the 4th century B.C. to late Hellenism; paintings from the tombs of Verghina to the invention of the landscape; Hellenistic sculpture; Greek art for Rome; Rome: the Kingdom and early and middle Republican age; art and politics in the late Republican age; the Augustan age; the Julio-Claudian and Flavian ages; the century of the "good emperors" (from Nerva to the Antonini); the third century A.D.; late antique art.

    The Greek agora and the Roman forum.

    Contents for students who are attending the 12-CFU course:

    Greek and Roman archeology and art from the Protogeometric to the late Imperial age: forms, paths, contexts. Topics covered: the origin and evolution of the temple in the Archaic age; the evolution of the statuary type of the kouros; female statuary and korai; vase painting in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, the black-figure technique; 5th century sculpture up to Polykleitos and Phidias; the sanctuary of Olympia: architecture and sculpture; vase painting from red figures to the echoes of megalographies; the acropolis of Athens: architecture and sculpture; post-Parthenon architecture and sculpture; Praxiteles, Skopas and Lysippos; architecture from the 4th century B.C. to late Hellenism; paintings from the tombs of Verghina to the invention of the landscape; Hellenistic sculpture; Greek art for Rome; Rome: the Kingdom and early and middle Republican age; art and politics in the late Republican age; the Augustan age; the Julio-Claudian and Flavian ages; the century of the "good emperors" (from Nerva to the Antonini); the third century A.D.; late antique art.

    The Greek agora and the Roman forum.

    The Roman villa.

    RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Bibliography for students who are taking the 6-CFU course:

    On the Greek part:
    G. BEJOR, M. CASTOLDI, C. LAMBRUGO, Arte greca, Mondadori, Milano 2013.
    On the Roman part:
    M. TORELLI, M. MENICHETTI, G.L. GRASSIGLI, Arte e archeologia del mondo romano, Longanesi, Milano 2008.

    P. ZANKER, Arte romana, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2012.

    Further reading suggestions may be provided in class.

    Class attendance is highly recommended; the students who cannot attend the course should contact the Professor in order to agree on a possible individual syllabus.

    Bibliography for students who are taking the 9-CFU course:

    On the Greek part:
    G. BEJOR, M. CASTOLDI, C. LAMBRUGO, Arte greca, Mondadori, Milano 2013.
    On the Roman part:
    M. TORELLI, M. MENICHETTI, G.L. GRASSIGLI, Arte e archeologia del mondo romano, Longanesi, Milano 2008.

    P. ZANKER, Arte romana, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2012.

    On Greek agora and Roman forum:

    C. MARCONI, L’agora e il santuario. I centri della vita pubblica nella polis di età arcaica e classica, in M. Vetta (a cura di), La civiltà dei Greci. Forme, luoghi, contesti, Carocci, Roma 2001, pages 225-244, 258-260.

    C. AMPOLO (ed.), Agora greca e agorai di Sicilia, Edizioni della Normale, Pisa 2012, pages 1-30.

    P. GROS, L’architettura romana dagli inizi del III secolo a.C. alla fine dell’alto Impero. I monumenti pubblici, Longanesi & C., Milano 2001, pages 228-300.

    Further reading suggestions may be provided in class.

    Class attendance is highly recommended; the students who cannot attend the course should contact the Professor in order to agree on a possible individual syllabus.

    Bibliography for students who are taking the 12-CFU course:

    On the Greek part:
    G. BEJOR, M. CASTOLDI, C. LAMBRUGO, Arte greca, Mondadori, Milano 2013.
    On the Roman part:
    M. TORELLI, M. MENICHETTI, G.L. GRASSIGLI, Arte e archeologia del mondo romano, Longanesi, Milano 2008.

    P. ZANKER, Arte romana, Laterza, Roma-Bari 2012.

    On Greek agora and Roman forum:

    C. MARCONI, L’agora e il santuario. I centri della vita pubblica nella polis di età arcaica e classica, in M. Vetta (a cura di), La civiltà dei Greci. Forme, luoghi, contesti, Carocci, Roma 2001, pages 225-244, 258-260.

    C. AMPOLO (ed.), Agora greca e agorai di Sicilia, Edizioni della Normale, Pisa 2012, pages 1-30.

    P. GROS, L’architettura romana dagli inizi del III secolo a.C. alla fine dell’alto Impero. I monumenti pubblici, Longanesi & C., Milano 2001, pages 228-300.

    On the Roman villa:

    H. MIELSCH, La villa romana, Giunti, Firenze 1999, pages 5-170.

    Further reading suggestions may be provided in class.

    Class attendance is highly recommended; the students who cannot attend the course should contact the Professor in order to agree on a possible individual syllabus.

    TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

    Exam Board

    ANTONINO FACELLA (President)

    SILVIA PALLECCHI

    FABRIZIO BENENTE (Substitute)

    LESSONS

    LESSONS START

    February, 2023

    EXAMS

    EXAM DESCRIPTION

    Oral exam. The exam can be divided in two parts, but only within the same sesson (summer, autumn, winter).

    ASSESSMENT METHODS

    The exam will take place in oral form, and will allow to verify the knowledge and understanding of the topics covered in class and of the texts listed in the appropriate section of the bibliography. The exam will also verify the student's ability to critically analyze the issues, making an appropriate use of bibliographic tools and using a proper language.

    The degree of learning achieved will be assessed according to the following scale of values:

    1. if the student demonstrates that he/she has understood the proposed texts and the topics discussed in class, showing critical skills and framing ability, and is able to use a proper language and vocabulary, the exam will be assessed as very good to excellent (28 to 30 cum laude);

    2. knowledge of an exclusively or predominantly mnemonic type, lacking a deep understanding of the topics covered but capable of developing simple interpretative reasoning, combined with the use of a correct but not always appropriate language will lead to an assessment as good (25 -27) or satisfactory (23-24);

    3. an approximate knowledge of the topics covered, a superficial understanding of the issues discussed and inappropriate methods of expression will lead to assessing the exam as sufficient (18-22);

    4. learning gaps, inappropriate language, inability to find the way within the bibliography and the topics presented in class will be negatively assessed (fail).

    Exam schedule

    Date Time Location Type Notes

    FURTHER INFORMATION

    Information on the possibility of participating in laboratory activities and in excavation and survey campaigns will be provided in class.

    For any further questions about the course and the exam, the teacher is available in office hours and can be contacted by email: antonino.facella@unige.it