Skip to main content
CODE 80475
ACADEMIC YEAR 2024/2025
CREDITS
SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR SPS/05
LANGUAGE Italian
TEACHING LOCATION
  • GENOVA
SEMESTER 1° Semester
TEACHING MATERIALS AULAWEB

OVERVIEW

The 6-CFU course will present the main features of social and cultural history of Latin America. It will also analyze how Latin-American countries became part of the Western economy and culture. The course follows a thematic-chronological structure starting with the history of pre-Columbian States and ending with the authoritarian regimes of the 20th century. The 9-CFU course includes a monographic part. 

AIMS AND CONTENT

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowing the basic features of the history of Central and South America, from Spanish and Portuguese invasions to the end of the 20th century; studying the development of Latin-American societies in ethnic, social, cultural and territorial perspectives. Studying the basic features of the social and cultural history of Latin-American countries, from the Spanish and Portuguese invasions to the authoritarian regimes of the 20th century, through a thematic-chronological approach.

AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

The primary objective of the Latin American History course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the history of Central and South America, spanning from the pre-Columbian era to the twentieth century's conclusion. Emphasizing the formation of Latin American societies from ethnic, cultural, social, and territorial perspectives, the course aims to equip students with fundamental knowledge. Additionally, the monographic section of the course focuses on in-depth exploration of specific historiographic issues, allowing students to apply the acquired knowledge and methodologies from the core curriculum.

By the course's conclusion, students will have developed the ability to place the history of Latin American regions within the broader context of world history. While considering references to the history of the Near and Far East, particularly in relation to migratory patterns, students will also gain a profound appreciation for the ethnic, social, economic, and cultural diversities present in South American regions. Furthermore, they will acquire a solid grasp of the periodization of Latin American history and will be encouraged to compare it with European and non-European realities, drawing upon their accumulated knowledge from the three-year program.

Throughout the course, students will demonstrate autonomy in their work, showcasing their expertise in scientific literature, honing their argumentative skills, and fostering a collaborative approach to group work. They will develop strong coordination and negotiation abilities, while also refining their communication skills to engage in constructive and dialogic interactions. Moreover, the course will enhance their ability to manage social interactions, cultivating a cooperative and inclusive environment.

PREREQUISITES

None.

TEACHING METHODS

The course will comprise a combination of face-to-face lectures delivered by the lecturer and classroom presentations given by attending students.

The lectures will be conducted in-person. However, upon explicit request to the lecturer, students will have the option to remotely participate in the lectures through streaming on the Teams platform. Those students who choose to attend the lectures via Teams will be classified as non-attending and will be expected to adhere to the specific program outlined above.

SYLLABUS/CONTENT

 

Programme for students opting for the 6 CFU course:

The course offers fundamental knowledge of the social and cultural history of Latin American regions, following a thematic and chronological framework that begins with the formation of pre-Columbian states and concludes with the authoritarian regimes of the twentieth century.

Programme for students opting for the 9 CFU course:

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the social and cultural history of Latin American regions, following a thematic and chronological framework that begins with the formation of pre-Columbian states and concludes with the authoritarian regimes of the twentieth century. Additionally, there will be a monographic section focusing on the role of the press, intellectuals, and artists in the resistance against bureaucratic-authoritarian regimes in the Southern Cone of Latin America.

RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bibliography for students using the 6 CFU course:

FOR ATTENDING STUDENTS:

  1. Marcello Carmagnani and Chiara Vangelista, "I nodi storici delle aree latino-americane," Otto Editore, Turin, 2001 (part two, pages 129-263).
  2. Loris Zanatta, "Storia dell'America Latina contemporanea," Laterza, Bari, 2010.

FOR NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS:

  1. Marcello Carmagnani, "L'altro Occidente. L'america Latina dall'invasione europea al nuovo millennio," Einaudi, Turin, 2003.
  2. Chiara Vangelista, "Scatti sugli Indios. Ricerche di storia visiva," Aracne, Rome, 2018.

Bibliography for students using the 9 CFU course:

FOR ATTENDING STUDENTS:

  1. Loris Zanatta, "Storia dell'America Latina contemporanea," Laterza, Bari, 2010. Additional material for the monographic section will be provided during the lectures.

FOR NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS:

  1. Loris Zanatta, "Storia dell'America Latina contemporanea," Laterza, Bari, 2010.
  2. Chiara Vangelista, "Scatti sugli Indios. Ricerche di storia visiva," Aracne, Rome, 2018.
  3. Fulvia Zega, "Il mondo sotto la svastica. Immigrazione e politica in Argentina e Brasile," Aracne, Rome, 2018.

 

TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

LESSONS

LESSONS START

21st September 2023

EXAMS

EXAM DESCRIPTION

For attending students: classroom presentations and an oral examination. Attending students may also have the option to take a written exemption test at the halfway point of the course.

For non-attending students: an oral examination.

The duration of the examination will be approximately 30 minutes. The allocated time for the oral examination varies depending on the chosen program (6 or 9 CFU) and is not directly proportional to the student's level of preparation. The evaluation, on a scale of thirty, will be divided as follows: assessment of factual knowledge - maximum 15/30; assessment of the ability to analyze and contextualize specific issues within a broader historical framework - maximum 12/30; assessment of communicative skills - maximum 3/30.

The assessment method is based on the student's ability to contextualize the exam topics within their historical framework, both at a general level (Latin America) and at a local level (individual countries or specific areas). It is important to demonstrate a command of the disciplinary terminology, the ability to make interdisciplinary connections among the topics covered, while taking into account each student's curriculum, which will be clarified at the beginning of the examination. However, individual grades obtained in specific exams will not be discussed.

The examination takes the form of a conversation, during which the student's specific knowledge and their awareness of the characteristics of the studied texts (general history and monographs) will be assessed. Furthermore, the student's ability to respond to potential criticisms or requests for clarification during their exposition will also be evaluated.

 

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The course incorporates in-class presentations, reading workshops, or image analysis laboratories. Students following the 6 CFU program are required to complete one such exercise, while those on the 9 CFU program are expected to complete two. These practical exercises are not individually graded but are integral components of the curriculum for attending students.

As part of the 9 CFU program, students have the option to undertake a mid-term written test (consisting of three open-ended questions, with a time limit of two hours) focused on the general history segment spanning from the initial settlement of the American continent to the period of Independence. The evaluation of the mid-term test is denoted by letter grades, ranging from A (highest evaluation) to D (satisfactory), and E (insufficient). Successfully passing this test will exempt students from the general history portion, covering the period from the initial settlement to Independence, during the subsequent oral examination.