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LATIN PALEOGRAPHY

CODE 65251
ACADEMIC YEAR 2022/2023
CREDITS
  • 9 cfu during the 1st year of 8459 STORIA (L-42) - GENOVA
  • 9 cfu during the 3nd year of 8453 CONSERVAZIONE DEI BENI CULTURALI (L-1) - GENOVA
  • 6 cfu during the 3nd year of 8457 LETTERE (L-10) - GENOVA
  • 6 cfu during the 2nd year of 11268 FILOLOGIA E SCIENZE DELL'ANTICHITA' (LM-15) - GENOVA
  • SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINARY SECTOR M-STO/09
    LANGUAGE Italian
    TEACHING LOCATION
  • GENOVA
  • SEMESTER 2° Semester
    TEACHING MATERIALS AULAWEB

    OVERVIEW

    The course will consider the development of the Latin script from its origins (7th century BCE) to the invention of printing in the 15th century. The lessons will explore the scripts of the Roman period, the commonly known “period of graphic particularity” (when the fragmentation of the Roman world translated into a similar fragmentation in the types of scripts), writing in the Carolingian period (when the script took on a uniform character), and the development of different canons in the later centuries.

    AIMS AND CONTENT

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The course aims at illustrating the history of writing in the Latin alphabet from the origins to the widespread diffusion of movable type printing in Western Europe.

     

    AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

    The course aims at ensuring that students acquire knowledge the following topics, competences and abilities: 1) knowledge of the main characteristics of each script and ability to place it in both the correct area where the script developed, and the proper chronological context; 2) ability to read the different types of script; 3) ability to recognize the different graphic forms. To reach these objectives each type of script will be discussed against its general background, thus defining the period in which the scripts developed and became widespread, their evolution and peculiar characteristics. This will be followed by a reading of texts which will enable to evaluate the general graphic layout and the peculiar graphic signs of each script.

    PREREQUISITES

    None

    TEACHING METHODS

    The course is divided in two modules of 6 and 3 ECTs. The course includes both taught and seminar classes, the latter will involve reading texts written by authors from different areas and centuries. 

    The lessons will hopefully be held in person, with the possibility for stutents to follow even at a distance via video conference on the Teams platform.

    The code to access the lessons on Teams is: enidkhy

     

    SYLLABUS/CONTENT

    Program for students who take the course for 6 ECTs

     

    A general overview of the history of the Latin script and its different uses in Western Europe from the origins to the 9th century. From the 6th century to the end of the Roman Empire, despite different types of scripts (capital, uncial etc.) existed, these presented uniform characteristics as concerns both book and document. This was followed by the so-called “period of graphic particularity” when different forms of script developed in specific politically and institutionally homogenous geographical areas (Merovingian, Visigothic, Insular etc.). Only during the 9th century, with the diffusion of the Caroline script, writing took once again a shape that was common all over Charlemagne’s renewed Roman Empire. The lessons will be supported by PowerPoint/PDF presentations.

     

    Program for students who take the course for 9 ECTs

     

    An overview of the history of the Latin script (book and documentary) and of its different uses in Western Europe (Humanistic script, Mercantile script, Gothic script etc.) until the invention of printing during the 15th century. The lessons will be supported by PowerPoint/PDF presentations.

     

    RECOMMENDED READING/BIBLIOGRAPHY

     

    Bibliography for students who take the course for 6 ECTs

     

    G. CENCETTI, Paleografia latina, Roma, Jouvance, 2002 (or any other edition), pp. 7-121; 156-169.

    One text, to be chosen from the following:

    A. PETRUCCI, Prima lezione di paleografia, Roma, Laterza, 2007.

    G. COSTAMAGNA, Perché scriviamo così. Invito alla paleografia latina, Roma 1987 (Fonti e studi del Corpus membranarum italicarum, Studi e ricerche, XXVI).

    G. CENCETTI, Postilla nuova a un problema paleografico vecchio: l’origine della minuscola «carolina», in «Nova Historia», 7 (1955), pp. 1-24.

    Bibliographical material and the facsimile of the texts which will be presented during the lessons can be downloaded on pendrive at the lecturer’s office (via Balbi 2, 2nd floor) or from AulaWeb.

     

    Bibliography for students who take the course for 9 ECTs

     

    G. CENCETTI, Paleografia latina, Roma, Jouvance, 2002 (or any other edition).

    Three texts to be chosen from the following:

    A. PETRUCCI, Prima lezione di paleografia, Roma, Laterza, 2007.

    G. COSTAMAGNA, Perchè scriviamo così. Invito alla paleografia latina, Roma 1987 (Fonti e studi del Corpus membranarum italicarum, Studi e ricerche, XXVI).

    L. MIGLIO, Criteri di datazione per le corsive librarie italiane dei secoli XIII-XIV. Ovvero riflessioni, osservazioni, suggerimenti sulla lettera mercantesca, « Scrittura e Civiltà », 18 (1994) pp. 143-157.

    P. SUPINO MARTINI, Per la storia della ‘semigotica’, «Scrittura e civiltà», 22 (1998), pp. 249-264.
    S. ZAMPONI, La scrittura del libro nel Duecento, in Civiltà comunale: libro, scrittura, documento. Atti del Convegno (Genova, 8-11 novembre 1988), (Atti della Società ligure di storia patria, n. s., XXIX (1989), pp. 315-354.

    Bibliographical material and the facsimile of the texts which will be presented during the lessons can be downloaded on pendrive at the lecturer’s office (via Balbi 2, 2nd floor) or from AulaWeb

    TEACHERS AND EXAM BOARD

    Exam Board

    VALENTINA RUZZIN (President)

    LESSONS

    LESSONS START

    14 february 2022

    Class schedule

    LATIN PALEOGRAPHY

    EXAMS

    EXAM DESCRIPTION

    The exam consists in an oral test.

    During the exam the students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of the main characteristics and developments (both along the centuries and in different geographical areas) of two types of script (three for those who take also the second module).

    Students will also be tested on the ability to read two examples of scripts (three for those who take also the second module).

    Lastly, they will be required to illustrate in detail one of the scripts (two for those who take also the second module).

    ASSESSMENT METHODS

     

    To ensure that the students have a sound knowledge of the contents they will be questioned on: general aspects that will enable the examiners to evaluate the students’ ability to report on the main topics, their readiness in discussing the main arguments by displaying specific and adequate knowledge, and in answering to objections and requests for clarification. The examiners will also evaluate the students’ ability in supporting their arguments by making interdisciplinary connections (without straying away from the main course topics). The examiners will furthermore evaluate the students’ ability to read, analyse and contextualize book and documentary scripts discussed during the course.

    1. Students who demonstrate to have sound knowledge of the topic and the abovementioned abilities be awarded between 28 and 30 e lode (very good to excellent);

    2. Students who demonstrate a mnemonic knowledge (though displaying a correct use of the proper lexicon), but with little ability to establish connections among topics will be given between 25 and 27 (satisfactory to good);

    3. Students showing superficial or scarce knowledge of the topics and using an inappropriate lexicon will be given between 18 and 22 (passing grade);

    4. Students who show scarce knowledge, who use an inappropriate lexicon and who are unable to discuss the different topics presented during the course as well as the bibliography, will be given a failing grade.

    FURTHER INFORMATION

    Attendance is highly recommended.

    The program for those who attend regularly the lectures and those who do not attend is the same considering that the latter will find it more difficult to prepare alone the reading of, and commentary to facsimile of the scripts presented during the lectures.